Saturday, April 24
Mushroom Walks at AOA Preserves along the Hocking

Mushrooms

Mushroom season is upon us. Healthy, native forests provide many resources to sustain us. One of the tastiest is the wild mushroom. If you are not already a seasoned mushroom hunter, join us for a special mushroom event in the Hocking Hills as we explore some of AOA’s preserves along the Hocking River and learn how to look for spring mushrooms.

Due to crowd size constraints, we can accommodate a total of only 40 people for this event – 20 in the morning and 20 in the afternoon session. You must register on Eventbrite to participate. This is an outdoor event that will be conducted in conformance with applicable Covid-19 recommendations for social distancing.

Event Information

Sunday, April 25
Off the Beaten Path – Wildflower and Waterfall Photography at Bison Hollow

Off the Beaten Path

Tiny bluets and long-spurred violets line the trail into the north entrance of Bison Hollow. High sandstone bluffs tower over the blue-green waters of the deepest part of the stream below and tall Hemlocks line the sides of the hollow. Then there are the bluebells and trillium that gently sway with the breeze, perhaps along with the sight of a Columbine plant tucked away near a waterfall. As if all the varieties of spring ephemerals were not enough, the sounds of waterfalls sooth the soul and provide endless photographic possibilities.

Come join us on an outing on to photograph the bounty of nature subjects we will see at Appalachia Ohio Alliance’s Bison Hollow Preserve. Bison Hollow is
one of AOA’s treasured properties that offers up a perfect opportunity to be fully present in the moment. All the worries of the day fade away in this place.

Fifteen spots for photographers will be available with registration through Eventbrite. This is an outdoor event that will be conducted in conformance with applicable Covid-19 recommendations for social distancing.

Event Information

AOA Preserves Upper Big Darby Creek Property

A beaver lodge appears at the edge of the stream. Majestic sycamores shade the riparian corridor cooling the water for the resident smallmouth bass and mollusks. Stately oaks several hundred years old join the hickory trees on the ridge in providing habitat for the great horned owls and bald eagles often seen here. A snapping turtle slides off a log into the green waters of the creek as a heron takes off from its perch, as kayakers drift by marveling at the quiet beauty so close to the expanding Columbus metropolis.

This property was once home to some of this country’s easternmost tallgrass prairie. An oak savanna consisting of scattered oaks soaring above wildflowers and prairie grass. What stories these 300 year old oaks could tell if they could talk. Perhaps they would explain that prairie wildflowers blanketed the ground all summer, and Native Americans often would use controlled fire to help hunt bison and assist plant management. Or that the first white settler in this area, Jonathan Alder – kidnapped by the Shawnees from Virginia – likely frequented this riverbank as he lived in a cabin not far downstream.

Like in the pioneer times when Jonathan Alder wandered these woods, these are times of change. The native hunters are long gone. The challenges of today are much different, but no less urgent. Pressing urbanization is endangering the protection of a stream that is blessed with tremendous aquatic biodiversity- over 100 species of fish and 40 species of freshwater mollusk. In many ways the Darby is a window back in time to the years before European settlement, yet development remains a serious threat. In 2019, the conservation group “American Rivers” named the Darby one of America’s most threatened rivers.

This Big Darby Oaks property has been forever protected through a recent acquisition by AOA with funding from OEPA. This site includes high bluff along the river with bottomland riparian habitat and fields that are being converted to native prairie. A patch of old forest has been cut but never cleared for farming like most of land in this area.

With your help, more can be done to protect one of our country’s Wild and Scenic Rivers, Big Darby Creek, and the flora and fauna that call it home. Click the link below to make your tax-deductible contribution so AOA can continue its important work in the Big Darby Conservation Corridor.

Donate to Support Darby Creek Conservation

AOA Adds Key Property to Scioto River Flyway Corridor

Scioto River Flyway

Protection and restoration of the Fleming Bend property continues AOA’s ongoing and successful efforts to protect and restore the Lower Scioto River and its tributaries as part of our Scioto River Flyway Corridor Initiative. This 309-acre property which protects 13,880 linear feet of riparian floodplain is an important addition to the corridor. Located in central Pickaway County, immediately west of downtown Circleville, the Fleming Bend site lies on a large bend in the Scioto River. It includes a 50-acre island surrounded by river channel.

The Fleming Bend addition project is being undertaken with Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program monies designated for protection and restoration of high-quality steams and wetlands in Ohio. This project is administered by the Ohio Department of Environmental Protection (OEPA) which recently completed an environmental assessment process for the project. A complete copy of the environmental documents may be found here. The City of Columbus’ Lower Olentangy Tunnel WPCLF loan project is the municipal sponsor for this property.

Read More About Fleming Bend

AOA Moves Forward with Big Darby Creek Conservation

Over 285 Acres to be Added

Big Darby

AOA is working to add new properties to AOA’s Big Darby Creek Conservation Corridor in Pickaway County. Big Darby Creek is a National and State designated Scenic River that is recognized as “one of the most biologically diverse aquatic systems in the Midwest”. It is home to 38 known state and federally listed species, including numerous freshwater mussels and fish.

These properties will be conserved with funding from the Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program, which seeks to protect and restore high-quality streams and wetlands in Ohio. This program is administered by the Ohio Department of Environmental Protection which recently completed a limited environmental assessment process for the Big Darby Creek Conservation Corridor Additions project. A complete copy of the environmental documents may be found here. AOA’s new Big Darby conservation properties are being sponsored by the City of Columbus’ Lower Olentangy Tunnel WPCLF loan project.

Read About Two New Big Darby Properties

2019 Year in Review

Thanks to your support 2019 was another very successful year for land and water conservation. AOA celebrated the conservation of 16 new properties totaling over 1,400 acres. These included 665 acres in the Paint Creek corridor, 200 acres along Big Darby Creek and over 260 acres in the Hocking Hills, key AOA initiative focuses.

Check out our most recent activities and accomplishments in our most recent Year in Review. If you would like to receive a hard copy via mail, please contact AOA at aoalt@earthlink.net.

2019 Year In Review
AOA 2019 Year In Review

Our Mission

Appalachia Ohio Alliance is dedicated to the conservation and stewardship of our land and water as sustainable natural resources that are an asset and a legacy for our community

Mission and Goals

Support Us

Appalachia Ohio Alliance is a regional non-profit conservancy dedicated to the conservation of land and water resources in central and southeastern Ohio. Find out how you can help our efforts.

Donate Today

Upcoming Events

Get outside with AOA and explore and enjoy the beauty that surrounds us!

Apr
23
Fri
Work Day at Mercer Woods Old Growth Preserve
Apr 23 all-day
Apr
24
Sat
Mushroom Walks at AOA Preserves Along the Hocking
Apr 24 all-day
Mushroom season is upon us. Healthy, native forests provide many resources to sustain us. One of the tastiest is the wild mushroom. If you are [...]
Apr
25
Sun
Off the Beaten Path with AOA – Wildflower and Waterfall Photography @ Bison Hollow
Apr 25 @ 8:00 am – 12:00 pm
Tiny bluets and long-spurred violets line the trail into the north entrance of Bison Hollow. High sandstone bluffs tower over the blue-green waters of the [...]
Apr
27
Tue
Volunteer Work Day at Mercer Woods
Apr 27 all-day
May
2
Sun
Hike AOA’s New Stone Canyon Preserve
May 2 all-day
May
4
Tue
Volunteer Work Day at Fickardt Farm Preserve
May 4 all-day
May
6
Thu
Utzinger Bog Walk and Campfire
May 6 all-day
May
8
Sat
Hike, Photography and Wildflowers at Kleinmaier SNP
May 8 all-day
May
12
Wed
Volunteer Work Day at Wildasinn on Big Darby
May 12 all-day
May
16
Sun
Orchid Walk at Mercer Woods
May 16 all-day
May
19
Wed
Volunteer Work Day at Big Darby Oaks
May 19 all-day
May
22
Sat
Hike at Mishe Moneto
May 22 all-day
May
26
Wed
Volunteer Work Day at Igel
May 26 all-day

Find Events

Testimonials

When we consider what it took to create this landscape, we must also consider what we can do to insure that future generations will also be able to marvel at its beauty.
Paul Knoop
The scenic views, diversity of plants and wildlife, and quiet times in the country will all be enhanced by the security of knowing that things can stay this way into the future.
Larry R. Menchhofer

In the end, I decided to sell my property to AOA because I love it so much. It was hard to part with it – but I am not really parting with it – it is there forever thanks to AOA.

Read Full Testimonial

Steve Fought

Latest News

Bald Eagle Released Back into the Wild Marsha G. Schneider Preserve, Pickaway County

September 17th, 2019|Comments Off on Bald Eagle Released Back into the Wild Marsha G. Schneider Preserve, Pickaway County

AOA Moves Forward with Big Darby Creek Conservation – Adds Over 530 Acres

November 27th, 2018|Comments Off on AOA Moves Forward with Big Darby Creek Conservation – Adds Over 530 Acres

AOA Conserves Hocking Canal Lock

November 20th, 2018|Comments Off on AOA Conserves Hocking Canal Lock

AOA Partners in Ohio Bat Conservation Project
Over 500 Acres to be Conserved

November 1st, 2018|Comments Off on AOA Partners in Ohio Bat Conservation Project
Over 500 Acres to be Conserved

AOA Initiatives Featured in The Buckeye Bulletin

October 8th, 2017|Comments Off on AOA Initiatives Featured in The Buckeye Bulletin